Ivanka Trump accused of tweeting 'fake' Chinese proverb

Her tweet came on the eve of the day when her father, Donald Trump, met the North Korean leader at Capella Hotel in Singapore's Sentosa Island to hold talks, in a bid to resolve the decades-long nuclear stand-off between the two countries. "Please help!" the news channel for Sina - the company behind Weibo, China's largest Twitter-like platform - wrote on its official social media account.

"'This not even remotely an actual Chinese proverb.' - Chinese Proverb", angryasianman tweeted.

Others, however, think this popular saying in China could be what Ivanka was referring to: "If you can do it, do it; if you can't, shut up".

"'Those who say it cannot be done, should not interrupt those doing it.' -Chinese Proverb", Ivanka posted on Monday, the night before her father and Kim came together to seek an end to a tense decadesold nuclear stand-off. Her six-year-old daughter, Arabella Kushner, became an online sensation by singing ballads in Mandarin and reciting Chinese poetry in a video that was shown to President Xi Jinping during Mr Trump's visit to Beijing last year.

Maybe she just saw it on a fortune cookie?

Only catch? Chinese Twitter users couldn't recognise the "proverb" as one of their own.

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This is not Ms Trump's first apparent misattribution to Chinese lore.

"It sounds more legitimate and credible to pronounce a quote coming from the ancient civilisation of China". She then falsely attributed that saying to the Chinese philosopher Confucius. "To be fair, the Chinese language has hundreds and arguably thousands of times more proverbs and sayings than any other language", Herzberg said.

It may have originated in 1903 in "The Public" - a Chicago-based magazine - and evolved over the years, according to a 2015 article by Quote Investigator.

William Kristol, a conservative pundit, joked that the White House, in the midst of a heated trade dispute with China, had given away a valuable American invention.

"Why are Trump WH aides giving our proverbs to China, increasing our proverb deficit?"

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