NCAA announces transfer, football redshirt rule changes

NCAA announces transfer, redshirt rule changes

Division I Eliminates Permission-to-Contact Transfer Process

The NCAA's Transfer Working Group proposed the change in fall 2017 in an attempt to separate a student-athlete's interest in transferring to a new school from the process of receiving a scholarship at the new school. Instead of a student-athlete asking for permission to transfer from his or her school, the student-athlete will now simply inform the school of his or her decision to transfer.

Per Hosick, starting with the upcoming 2018-19 academic year, the council also ruled athletes can play in up to four games each season without losing a season of competition. The policy will not go into effect until October 15.

The Division I council also slightly altered transfer rules.

Nicholas Clark, a former football player at Coastal Carolina and a member of a student representative on the council, said the change promotes fairness and the well-being of college athletes.

Under the new rule, athletes would be permitted to be contacted when they notify their current coaches, who have two days to enter the names into a database created and managed by the NCAA that will alert schools who can be recruited.

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American Football Coaches Association executive director Todd Berry lobbied for the redshirt rule change for years and reiterated it had "unanimous" support from the coaches.

While conferences can still vote to create more restrictive legislation - such as preventing in-conference moves - this ruling should decrease the number of instances in which schools block players from transferring.

"What I like about the four games, and the model that I think we would use, is you play the first three games to see who can actually do it", Franklin said during spring practice. As of now, schools can not cut off an athlete's financial aid based on intent to transfer at the end of a term - but the NCAA will vote on two different proposals that would allow institutions to end aid after an athlete's intent to transfer has been made clear.

Much of the talk about transfers focuses on the so-called year-in-residence, the one year a player in the most high-profile sports such as football and basketball must sit out after switching schools. If he played in one more game, he would not have been eligible for a medical redshirt. The so-called autonomy conferences will consider two different proposals to allow schools to cancel the aid.

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