Trump to announce Supreme Court nominee

Anticipation Builds Ahead Of Trump's Supreme Court Nominee Unveiling

The Latest: Liberals rally on court steps against Kavanaugh

US President Donald Trump is due to announce his latest US Supreme Court pick, kicking off a contentious nomination process.

Of the court's liberal justices, Ruth Bader Ginsburg is 85 and Stephen Breyer turns 80 next month, so Trump may well get another opportunity to cement conservative dominance of the court for years to come. Like Trump's first nominee past year, Justice Neil Gorsuch, Kavanaugh would be a young addition who could help remake the court for decades to come with rulings that could restrict abortion, expand gun rights and roll back key parts of Obamacare.

"In a nation with over 700 sitting federal judges, many of whom were appointed by Republican presidents, it is outrageous that President Trump will nominate from a list of just 25 dictated to him by the Heritage Foundation", Casey complained. But his supporters cite his experience and wide range of legal opinions.

Republican Senator Roy Blunt of Missouri told NBC's "Meet The Press" the president should take note of that political reality in his choice.

Conservative groups like Judicial Crisis Network and American Crossroads have each pledged over $1 million in ads encouraging support or opposition to Trump's eventual nominee. Kennedy sometimes joined the liberal justices on key rulings on divisive social issues like abortion and gay rights, a practice his replacement may not duplicate. "In the coming days, I will be reviewing the record and qualifications of the president's nominee".

Hearings for the most recent nominees to the Supreme Court have lasted four or five days, though there were 11 days of hearings for Robert Bork's nomination in 1987. He expressed renewed interest in Hardiman - the runner-up when Trump nominated Gorsuch, said two people with knowledge of his thinking who were not authorized to speak publicly.

"It is emphatically the province and duty of the judiciary to say what the law is, not what it should be", explains The Federalist Society's website. Time and time again, the party in control of the Senate and White House saw their selections for powerful positions filibustered by their opponents in the minority. In the coming year the court might have to consider Trump's powers and rights in the investigation into links between his presidential campaign and Russian Federation, and whether he sought to obstruct that investigation.

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His parents, along with other families, have maintained a constant vigil at the site since the boys became trapped. Asked how the authorities had decided which boys were to be taken out first, Mr Narongsak said: "Their health".


In Janus v. AFSCME, Gorsuch voted to overrule a 41-year-old precedent upholding the constitutionality of state laws that allow public sector unions to require nonmembers to pay their fair share of the costs of collective bargaining. Senate rules still leave Democrats with scant options to block confirmation by themselves, though Trump must prevent Republican defections.

Barrett is a Notre Dame Law School alumna, and she received the Hoynes Prize, the Law School's highest honor.

MARTIN: Amy Barrett is also someone who might have a tough time.

Kavanaugh, 53, began his career as a clerk to Kennedy. But she famously clashed with Senator Dianne Feinstein during her confirmation hearing a year ago to be an appeals court judge.

A graduate of Yale and Yale Law, he also was a member of Kenneth Starr's independent counsel team that investigated President Bill Clinton. Trump insisted he still hadn't locked down his decision, which he wants to keep under wraps until a 9 p.m. Monday announcement from the White House. The official said the White House reached out to every member of the Senate Judiciary Committee, which will hold confirmation hearings, and that only Democrat Kamala Harris "refused to engage". He called it the "fruit of a corrupt process straight from the D.C. swamp".

Elected officials in NY, including Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer, Sen.

While activists and progressive groups are targeting moderate Republican senators who support abortion rights like Susan Collins of ME and Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, urging them to reject any Trump nominee who is hostile to Roe v. Wade, a handful of Democrats will be key in deciding whether the president gets his pick confirmed to the high court, because of the razor-thin partisan divide in the Senate.

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