Rick Scott says state will fight red tide

Beaches at Boca Grande have been affected

Beaches at Boca Grande have been affected Credit iStock

The sparkling white sand of Florida's southwestern beaches aren't dotted with sunbathers this week.

Now red tide is causing additional wildlife to wash up on beach shores and begin rotting.

Florida's southwest waterways are now under assault by two different combatants: A red tide bloom from the Gulf of Mexico and a separate toxic algae bloom, which many believe is linked to discharge from Lake Okeechobee.

The harmful algae bloom has also been hurting businesses in the area.

"We are seeing more than double the number of animals being impacted at this time of the year, from the red tide", said Trindell. "We're even seeing large loggerhead sea turtles being effected, and that's because this red tide has lasted into the nesting season".

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It published pictures via its Twitter feed on Saturday (August 4) while a media company also released aerial footage. Later, each sign was given an identifying number to let pilots know where they were and to help them navigate.


Gov. Rick Scott on Friday said he directed state agencies "to mobilize all available resources to address red tide impacts in Southwest Florida's coastal communities".

Tyler DeGraff told ABC7 there were thousands of dead fish and the potent smell of death in the air. FWC arrived and is helping to transport the manatee to SeaWorld in Orlando, where it will be treated and monitored until it can be released back into the wild.

Florida Fish and Wildlife officials say controlling the red tide is complicated. The toxin affects marine life and causes respiratory irritation in humans and animals.

K. brevis produces neurotoxins that can sicken and kill fish, seabirds, turtles and other marine life. Those who are looking for spots free of red tide can visit https://visitbeaches.org and myfwc.com/redtidestatus to see which beaches have been affected.

The Miami Herald reported the blue-green algae outbreak had grabbed national attention.

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