China reports 18400 voluntary organ donors by July

Live Donor T-shirt wearer

Image The changes to the system will presume consent for organ donation

The plans, which are expected to come into effect in spring 2020, will mean consent for organ donation after death is presumed unless the person has opted-out.

An NHS sign is seen at St Thomas' Hospital in central London, Britain May 12, 2017.

Jackie Doyle-Price, Secretary of State for Mental Health and Inequalities, said the changes could save up to 700 lives every year, but she said organ donation remained a gift.

An "opt-out" system for organ donation will be introduced in the United Kingdom in a move that should save hundreds of lives a year, the government will announce today.

Around 6,000 people in Britain are on the transplant waiting list and more than 400 patients died while waiting for a transplant a year ago, the public health service said.

China has recorded 18,433 voluntary organ donors, who donated 52,213 organs, from 2010 to mid-July this year.

The announcement comes after the Government launched a campaign, led by NHS Blood and Transplant with support from the National BAME Transplant Alliance, to address the cultural and religious barriers to organ donation in certain communities. There will also be strict safeguards in place and specialist nurses will always discuss donation with families so an individual's wishes are respected.

Kovacic determined to leave at all costs — Real Madrid
The Italian champions would then attempt to sign Lazio's Sergej Milinkovic-Savic to fill the gap left by Pjanic. Modric has been heavily linked with a summer move to join Serie A club, Inter Milan.


The legislation was subsequently introduced past year, and will return to the House of Commons in the autumn to be voted on.

Up to 700 more lives could be saved each year by a new organ donation system which will aim to tackle donor shortages.

Fiona Loud, policy director of Kidney Care UK, told BBC Breakfast the experience in Wales showed the new system depended on widespread public support. We believe the soft opt-out is the right thing to do, but it is not the only thing to do.

Simon Gillespie, chief executive of the British Heart Foundation, said: "There is a desperate shortage of organ donors in the UK".

Asked by the news anchor whether it would give doctors licence to take your organs, the medical ethicist said: "Sometimes if there is no known wish a doctor can approach relatives and some relatives decide not to donate".

"It's still really important for all of us to have conversations with our loved ones about organ donation so our wishes can be met if the worst should happen".

Latest News