Watch Tom Cruise's Impassioned PSA About the Dangers of Motion Smoothing

Watch Tom Cruise's Impassioned PSA About the Dangers of Motion Smoothing

Tom Cruise breaks silence on the 'soap opera effect' and we couldn't be happier

It's also been dubbed the "soap opera effect", given that it makes HD, big-budget movies look a lot like cheaply made daytime soap operas. "This is sometimes referred to as the 'soap opera effect'". This video featuring action film star Tom Cruise lacks the drama of most of the stuff he's involved with - but the message is still an important one for movie fans and tech geeks.

In the video, which was shared by Tom Cruise on Twitter, he explains that most TVs have something known as "Video interpolation", more commonly known as motion smoothing, which The Last Jedi director Rian Johnson once referred to as "liquid diarrhea.".

"We're talking to you from the set of Top Gun Maverick", Cruise says in the PSA, flanked by Mission Impossible: Fallout director Chris McQuarrie.

Motion smoothing technology most commonly comes under the guise of "240Hz TruMotion", "Motion Smoothing Effect" or "Auto Motion Plus" on TV sets.

It means the average viewer finds it too hard to turn off - and many realise something looks unusual without being able to pinpoint what it is.

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"If you own a modern high-definition television there's a good chance you're not watching movies the way filmmakers intended, and the ability for you to do so is not simple for you to access", McQuarrie added.

On most TVs, motion smoothing controls are under advanced picture settings, and each manufacturer has a different name for it.

Cruise is now filming Top Gun: Maverick, which is expected to be released in 2020.

Cruise tweeted the PSA on Tuesday, and in the video, he and McQuarrie discuss the reasoning behind motion smoothing, and how interested viewers can turn the effect off to better enjoy their films.

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